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What You Can Do

There is a strong need for more testing of pipeline steel and greater oversight of pipelines at the federal level. (See this Plains Justice letter to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.) You can help by contacting your Congressional representatives (Congresspeople, Senators) and asking them to request further testing of pipeline steel and greater federal oversight of pipelines. Here’s a link for contacting your Congressperson and another link for contacting your Senators.

If you’re concerned about tar sands pipelines in the Great Plains, you can also get in touch with others who have concerns.

If you have concerns about the Keystone Expansion pipeline in Kansas, you can contact Stephanie Cole at the Kansas chapter of the Sierra Club, (913) 906-9332.

If you have concerns about the Keystone XL pipeline in Montana, you can contact Northern Plains Resource Council at (406) 248-1154.

If you have concerns about the Keystone XL pipeline in Nebraska, you can contact Nebraska Wildlife Federation at (402) 477-1008 or Bold Nebraska.

If you have concerns about the Keystone XL pipeline in Oklahoma, you can contact Center for Energy Matters at (405) 844-3226.

If you have concerns about the Keystone XL pipeline in South Dakota, you can contact Stephanie Trask at Dakota Rural Action at (605) 697-5204 or (605) 718-4957.

If you have concerns about the Keystone XL pipeline in Texas, you can contact Public Citizen at (512) 477-1155. There is also a Facebook page, Texans Against Tarsands.

2 Comments leave one →
  1. Debbie permalink
    January 26, 2011 8:58 am

    This is another example of our government selling us out.If Washington would actually work for the big bucks they make off their people we would already have alternative energy .

  2. September 21, 2011 8:21 pm

    The number of leaks in the Keystone pipeline since it began operating in 2010 now stands at FOURTEEN. How can we expect a better record by the Keystone XL?

    I am very concerned about the huge amount of electricity the Keystone uses for pumping and assume the Keystone XL would be as wasteful.

    I am also concerned about the legal situation for any US citizens (landowners included) who might be injured or have property destroyed by these pipelines and/or the corrosive, toxic Tar Sands crude. Will NAFTA rules apply? Like the infamous NAFTA Chapter 11 rule that favors a foreign corporation over local environmental law?

    The ‘jobs’ and energy independence’ arguments in favor of the pipeline are not based on facts.

    I don’t think I have ever seen such unified opposition to a monstrous environmental threat as I have seen from US environmental groups to the Keystone XL .

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